Poverty in Rhode Island (Presentation to Interfaith Conference)

May 16, 2012 On May 16, leaders from Rhode Island’s faith-based communities helped answer the question “Why are people poor?”  Linda Katz, policy director, presented at the Rhode Island Interfaith Coalition annual conference, along with local and national thought leaders who discussed the systemic nature of poverty in Rhode Island. View Linda’s presentation from the conference “Poverty in Rhode Island.”

Facts about Rhode Island Works

The vast majority of RI Works recipients are young children. RI Works provides minimal cash support and work readiness services to approximately 7,000 low-income families. Almost 70 percent of RI Works recipients are children, and half of the children are under the age of six. In 40 percent of the families, only the children receive cash assistance, either because their …

Drastic Drops in Spending and Caseloads for Child Care Program in Rhode Island

March 27, 2012 The Child Care Assistance Program (CCAP) was enacted in 1997 to assure access to high quality child care for children in low and moderate income working families. Enrollment and funding increased each year until 2005. From 2005 to 2011 total funding declined by 40% and general revenue investment dropped from $56.1 million from $9.3 million in 2011. …

Rhode Islanders Need Child Care: Facts about the Child Care Assistance Program

March 27, 2012 The majority of Rhode Island families need child care. Seventy percent (70%) of Rhode Island children under age six have all parents in the workforce, meaning that these children spend at least some time in child care. That is higher than the U.S. average of 64%1. Child care is expensive. The average cost of care for children …

The Basics of the RI Works Program

The Rhode Island Works program, the state’s “welfare” program, provides minimal cash support and work readiness services to approximately 5,800 low-income families. RI Works was established under the Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF) block grant, which allows states great flexibility in program design. Rhode Island should have a program that provides a real “safety net” for children and an …

Rhode Island Standard of Need

November 10, 2010 Every two years, The Economic Progress Institute publishes The Rhode Island Standard of Need (RISN) to provide an accurate picture of how much it costs to live in Rhode Island, and to show how government assistance programs help families meet basic needs. The 2010 RISN found that it cost a single parent family nearly $50,000, and a …

Office of Child Support Reductions Weaken Enforcement Capabilities

May 10, 2010 The Child Support program, operated by the Office of Child Support Services, is vitally important to tens of thousands of Rhode Island single parent families. This issue brief explains how reductions in staff and high caseloads weaken the ability of child support enforcement to establish orders and collect support for families. Child Support Staff Cuts 2010 Report (PDF, …

An Uneven Path: State Investments in Women’s Economic Self-Sufficiency

Income and work support programs are vital to a woman’s ability to seek and sustain employment while caring for her family. Rhode Island, like all states, has invested in programs that help low and modest-income working mothers and their families make ends meet. These programs include child care assistance, cash assistance, low-cost health insurance, and child support enforcement. In recent …

State of Working Rhode Island 2007

February 03, 2007 Rhode Island’s economy weathered the 2001-2002 recession well, adding new jobs as growth in the rest of the country stalled. Since 2004, however, the Rhode Island economy has fallen behind. Job growth is slowing, unemployment rising and the median wage fell by 0.6% since 2000, making Rhode Island the only state in New England to experience a …