On Tax Day, ITEP and EPI Analyses Highlight Negative Effects of National and State Tax Policies on Income for People of Color

Rhode Island can address historic inequities by raising taxes on top 1 percent. Today, Tax Day 2021, is a good time to reflect on the inequitable distribution of wealth and income caused by decades of policies that disadvantaged people of color. A new report, “Taxes and Racial Equity: An Overview of State and Local Policy Impacts,” published by the Institute …

Highlights of Governor’s Proposed FY2022 Budget

Last month, Governor McKee released his FY2022 proposed budget. The “budget” totals $11.17 billion, a decrease of $1.56 billion over the enacted FY2021 budget. The Institute analyzed the budget, taking a look at proposals that are important to the fiscal health of the state and its residents. Here are some key points from the perspective of what will impact the …

Debunking the Providence Chamber / RIPEC false claims about increasing taxes on the top one percent

By Uprise RI On Thursday, UpriseRI editor and founder Steve Ahlquist held a discussion with Representative Karen Alzate (Democrat, District 60, Pawtucket) and three experts in public policy on legislation that, when passed, would raise the income tax on the top one percent of Rhode Islanders. The discussion was held in response to a video featuring Laurie White of the Greater Providence Chamber of Commerce and Michael DiBiase of the Rhode Island Public Expenditures …

Raising the RI Works benefit increase will lift families out of deep poverty

The monthly benefit provided to families has not been increased in 30 years, while all other New England states have adjusted their benefit to help families’ purchasing power keep up with inflation. In February, 2400 families were receiving RI Works benefits, including 5,578 people. The benefit, averaging $6 per person per day, is the lowest in New England. The bills …

Highlights of the 2020 General Assembly Session: 2021 Enacted Budget and Legislation

The $12.7 billion Fiscal Year 2021 budget was finally passed by the Rhode Island General Assembly and signed into law by Governor Gina Raimondo in December 2020. This budget was described as a “skinny” budget, meaning that no new measures were included vis-à-vis the FY2020 budget. That is, almost nothing proposed in January 2020 by Governor Raimondo in her recommended …

Executive Director Search

Stepping Back Read Rachel’s announcement of her stepping back as executive director and transitioning to a Senior Policy Analyst role at the Institute. Dear Friend, I’m writing to share some big news. Following five years as Executive Director, I have decided to take a step back from leadership of the Institute. I am grateful to have had the privilege of …

EPI calls for alternatives to budget cuts, including raising taxes

By Chris Bergenheim – August 31, 2020 11:47 am PROVIDENCE – The economic impact of the COVID-19 pandemic has been projected to cause a massive revenue shortfall for Rhode Island for fiscal 2021. The R.I. House Fiscal Office projects that the state will contend with a $617.7 million shortfall for the year, which will need to be addressed by the …

How to Cover Rhode Island’s Revenue Shortfall

With the economic fallout from the COVID-19 crisis, Rhode Island faces an estimated revenue shortfall of at least $617.7M for FY2021. As policymakers design the state’s FY2021 budget, they will consider this shortfall and means of addressing it. Contrary to claims that cutting spending will prove an absolute necessity, policymakers have options for avoiding destructive cuts — cuts that will …

The End of the Beginning

Excerpt from The End of the Beginning, Rhode Island Monthly, August 2020 Issue by Ellen Liberman … As generous as the State’s corporations and individuals have been, their contributions cannot replace the deep erosion of gove­ment benefits to needy families and individuals. For example, the current unemployment insurance benefits system, designed in the wake of the Great Depression, does not …